Visual Authorship and Intentionality

©James Nachtwey
  1. A survivor of a Hutu death camp poses for James at the height of the 1994 Rwandan Troubles. This photo influenced my professional practice in a way of believing in the power of information. Since I’m living in the country with the longest civil wars, war photography mostly influence my practice and James is the hero of my war photojournalism.
©James Nachtwey

2. James’ photo of 911 attack influenced me why should I always be ready for breaking news. When James captured this photo, he was right at ground zero and he only had about five seconds.

©Eddie Adams

3. This famous photo of Eddie Adams in the execution of Vietnam war influenced me of how the pictures make real history and how important is the photojournalist’s work is.

©Eddie Adams

4. This photo of Seventy-nine-year-old lion tamer Jules Jacot bumps heads one of the 19 lions under his charge at the St Louis Zoo by Eddie make me feel the power of adventure and extraordinary job.

©Philip Blenkinsop

5. This photograph of Philip influenced me of how the snapshot can give the strong and mysterious photograph.

©Philip Blenkinsop

6. This photograph by Philip influenced me to feel the scene as my own to bear. He always says “To photograph rage, I must feel that rage. to photograph loss, I must try to feel the weight of that loss as if it were my own to bear.” And his monographs always inspired me of the power of monograph and make me feel the different taste.

©Minzayar Oo

7. This photo of Minzayar shows miners with torchlights on their heads go over a pile of waste looking for jade. Some miners work by day, while others work at night but the mines never get a rest around the clock. Lumps of the precious stone can represent a fortune for small time prospectors: a handful of jade can be worth a million dollars. But rare finds such as these pale against the staggering wealth extracted by Myanmar’s military and the tycoons it helped enrich. The biggest firms are linked to Chinamost of the jade ends up there illegally. This photo influenced me to work on undercover issues.

©Minzayar Oo

8. This photo show Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, State Counselor of Myanmar in 2012, soon after she was elected to parliament. Her rise fuelled humanitarian hopes worldwide and this photo inspired me of how the skill and creation of photography can make people feel the different ways.

©Manny Librodo

9. Manny Librodo’s portrait always influenced me with the art. His portraits don’t just tell the story, they are pure works of art.

©Manny Librodo

10. This photo of Manny Lirodo’s portrait give me the sense of humor. And he influenced my professional work by his portrait art.

— Kyaw Soe —

A journalist based in Myanmar.

Student of Diploma in Visual Journalism — The Asian Center for Journalism at the Ateneo de Manila University

Journalist